Commercial Fishing Video Of The Day | F/V New Dawn


 

Purse seine videos are starting to roll in. Remember to upload your vids to http://www.fishfilmfest.com. We are just reviewing videos for the upcoming festival this January. | Via Youtube: A fun depiction of commercial salmon fishing in Kodiak, Alaska. Filmed aboard the F/V New Dawn using GoPros, iPhones, and a Nikon 3200 to capture the action. We omitted the awful weather, dangerously long work hours, Jellyfish to the face, and endless boat work for the sake of crew morale.

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Crew Spotlight | Dominic Neiri’s “Neverland”


Dominic Neiri, a fellow southeast Alaskan seiner, has created an incredible photo record from the legendary salmon season of 2103.  The e-book is entitled “Neverland.”   Dominic offered me an early sneak peek of the project and I love his perspective.  It’s fascinating to see familiar scenery with such a uniquely different artistic perspective.   Check out all the details at www.lifeofdom.com.  Please, make sure to purchase a copy of the e-book.  These images are just a taste, the e-book contains a whopping 148 pages!  Thanks, Dom, for reminding how amazing our job really is!  I’m also very excited to showcase fresh talent from the commercial fishing world. If you are a commercial fishermen and you have a creative project or an off season business that you would like to share, I would love hear from you.  I would like to start a new section on the website focusing on the talents of our fellow fishermen called Crew Spotlight.

Commercial Fishing Photo Of The Day | F/V Lisa Marie


Puget Sound allows larger seiners than southeast Alaska and the Lisa Marie is one of the largest seiners around. This boat even makes the new Fred Whal boats look small. This photo was was off of San Juan island during the 2013 Puget Sound Pink salmon fishery.

Summer Salmon 2013 | The Summer Of Nevers


There are rare moments in a person’s life when they realize that they are actually living part of history. This summer in Alaska broke every preconceived notion about commercial salmon fishing. Was it the weather? Was the sheer volume of fish? Actually, it was a combination of a few inconsequential factors that made the summer what it was. The Summer Of Nevers!

Over 267 million salmon were rallied into fishermen’s hands this season, making it the single largest run in history. Southeast Alaska broke numerous two day harvest records, topping out at over 9 million pounds. Prince William Sound also pounded away at the pink salmon. The sheer volume of fish prompted many canneries and processors to institute limits of the amount of salmon each boat can catch. Rumors hint at limits of only 30,000 pounds for some of the Prince William Sound seiners. In southeast Alaska the limits affected nearly every cannery, with the exception of Ocean Beauty. Even the highly touted Silver Bay Seafoods, which is a recent fish buyer founded by fishermen, wasn’t able to keep up with the volume. Canneries were plugged for days and were challenged to find the workers to keep up with the pace. Icicle Seafoods in Petersburg had a mass walkout of nearly 60 cannery workers who felt the long hours were just too much to handle. Also, Alaska General Seafoods, which is based out of Ketchikan with some Canadian roots in Prince Rupert, couldn’t keep all of their canning lines running due to lack of canadian labor force. The overwhelming volume of pink salmon surprised everyone this season, including the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. The run was upgraded twice over the season, once ADFG realized the full potential of the “humpynami.”

The sun just never stopped shining! Southeast Alaska experienced the single best summer for weather in ages. Temperatures soared throughout the region for a record-breaking numbers of days. The lack of rain caused a few problems with fish dying in dried up streams before spawning. In fact, Petersburg’s Blind Slough Hatchery experienced a huge die off of Chinnook salmon, as the heat and low oxygen content of the water was just too much for the fish to survive. The state’s all time record high was set in Talkeetna this summer at a whopping 96 degrees. Cordova also broke their all time heat record in July at 90 degrees. The swooping jet stream is to blame for the abnormal summer and the pattern leaves many meteorologists scratching their heads in amazement. This trend doesn’t bode well for southeast alaskan salmon, which thrive off of the moisture that the temperature rainforest provides. Only time will tell the full impact of this summer’s crazy weather.

On a more personal note, I would like to extend my gratitude to the captain and crew of the mighty F/V Quandary. After sixteen consecutive years of seining, I thought I had seen it all. This summer astonished me in so many ways that I can barely describe my joy. Thank you, Captain Tom, Taylor, Steve, and Kris! It will never be the same. I think this song will sum it up best! Enjoy. Also, stay tuned for daily updates and videos from the past season. I have an incredible tribute video coming up for my late friend Jay Fisher. Also, I have huge plans for the ComFishFilmFest this year.

Commercial Fishing Photo Of The Day | F/V Coral Sea Returns


 

I'm super stoked to sea the Coral Sea in southeast Alaska again this summer. This was the first boat I worked on, way back in 1998! With the advent of all the super seiners, I really hope this boat just comes out and slays the salmon this summer. I know the boat is fishy. The last time I fished on the boat, we easily caught over 1 million pounds. At today's market prices for pink salmon, that would be a great season. Good luck, to my friend Jay Smerka on running the boat this summer. Slay'em, Jay! I know the boat can do it and I know you can too. Good luck!

2011 West Coast Commercial Fishing Year in Review | Part I


A lot has happened in the world of commercial fishing within the past year. Halibut has dominated the recent headlines with serious implications of a failed fishery. Whereas, commercial salmon fishing has garnered some of the highest prices and catch returns in years. The commercial fishing industry seems to be plagued with more than is fair share of highs and lows. So, hunker down and we will go over some of last years biggest headlines in what some call the “Deadliest Business.”

Salmon

Salmon dominated the news this year with recent hints of a virus blooming in wild pacific salmon population and a geneticly designed Frankenfish that would solve all of our salmon farming issues. Also record harvests In southeast and Chignik supplied plenty of headlines too. Of course, news of an impending industrial mine in the heart of Alaska‘s sockeye country was met with fierce opposition throughout the year.
http://juneautek.com/2011/07/17/a-parade-of-pink-salmon-in-southeast-alaska/
http://juneautek.com/2011/11/01/capitalcityweekly-com-southeast-alaskas-online-newspaper/
http://juneautek.com/2011/10/24/alaska-ponders-isa-outbreak-in-wild-salmon-population/

Squid

Commercial squid fishing in California has seen a huge uptake in value within the last two seasons. In the past, the fishery could take up to six months to catch the quota of 180,000 tons. Last year they were done by Christmas. This year the boys were done by turkey day.

King Crab

Bering Sea King crab quotas were heavily cut this year, but record high prices and a quick season were great for consumers and producers. Southeast Alaskaeven got a chance at king crab this past October. Six years had passed since the last crab opener in the region, so locals were eager to cash in the on record prices.

Dungeness Crab

Dungy Crab soared this past season as Oregon delivered one of its highest valued harvests in years. The crab were selling for more than 2.65 in some regions.
http://juneautek.com/2011/01/02/oregon-crab-season-2010/

Sitka Sac Roe Herring

Sitka Herring was seriously impacted by the Japanese tsunami this spring. Right before the herring started showing, the tsunami devastated most of the Japanese seafood market, including the buyers. The tragedy resulted in a huge drop in the ex vessel price of herring. In 2010, herring were 410 dollars a ton. This spring we were only able to get 100 dollars a ton.

Up Next

The next segment will include halibut, pollock, and even some dive fisheries.  Feel free to add some suggestions or point me to stories that I may have overlookd